This site has limited support for your browser. We recommend switching to Edge, Chrome, Safari, or Firefox.

Latest


Jiří Kylián
REVIEWS | By Sara Veale

Classical Cores, Modern Moves

This triple bill weaves together works by three seminal twentieth-century choreographers: Jiří Kylián, John Neumeier and William Forsythe. As critic Sarah Crompton points out in the programme notes, each of these so-called ‘modern masters’ spent the early years of his career at the Stuttgart Ballet, where a hotbed of artistic innovation bloomed under the direction of the late John Cranko, who encouraged his dancers to create their own works during his reign as director in the 1960s. Together the works on display form a splendid retrospective on the ballet scene of the late twentieth century, and mark English National Ballet’s...

Continue Reading
Heidi Duckler Dance Theatre
REVIEWS | By Victoria Looseleaf

Space Opera

In real estate, the prevailing axiom is “location, location, location,” with Heidi Duckler, whom the Los Angeles Times once dubbed the “reigning queen of site-specific dance,” proving the dictum formidable. Whether choreographing in and around laundromats, shuttered hospitals, bowling alleys or parking lots, Duckler continues to mine magic in her choice of venue, tapping a collective vein that, in the process, invariably unlocks complex emotions.

Continue Reading
Chroma
REVIEWS | By Penelope Ford

Northern Lights

When the prerecorded voice of Karen Kain announced that this year marks her tenth anniversary as artistic director of the National Ballet of Canada, the theatre burst into applause. Twice. It is no secret that the company has transformed under her watch, and the mixed winter programme suggests nothing is out of reach. The four works, spanning the balletic spectrum, highlighted the company’s range, and gave glimpses of rising stars.

Continue Reading
Shout Out Loud
REVIEWS | By Gracia Haby

Shout Out Loud

If Chunky Move’s “Depth of Field,” the beginning of my Dance Massive 2015 marathon, was to show me a seasonal pattern unshaped by human hand, “Meeting” revealed a pattern defined by sixty-four small-scale robots whilst “Overworld” writhed in a chaotic pattern of YouTube fragments tethered to the four elements, earth, air, fire, and water. The tenuous link between these Dance Massive performances is solely that of my own programming: one night, two performances seen back-to-back, separated by an hour, at the North Melbourne Town Hall.

Continue Reading
Fleet Figures
REVIEWS | By Penelope Ford

Fleet Figures

Sylvain Émard Danse of Quebec celebrates their 25th anniversary this year, with a Canadian tour of Sylvain Émard’s most recent work, “Ce n’est pas la fin du monde” (“It’s not the end of the world”). The work premiered a year ago at the Plateau d’Eysines in Bordeaux during the Danse Toujours biennial, and the company have twice since visited France to perform the piece.

Continue Reading
Anouk van Dijk
REVIEWS | By Gracia Haby

Field Notes

Seated in a purpose built grandstand in the formally exposed run-though of Chunky Move and Australian Centre for Contemporary Art’s forecourt, I waited. From this position, squinting into the sun, I was presented with a brilliant urban stage set. I pondered what I might have missed in a space I have only ever moved through at speed; the ‘field notes’ of author Richard Mabey came to mind:

Continue Reading
Beauty Sleep
REVIEWS | By Victoria Looseleaf

Beauty Sleep

Contrary to Mae West’s delicious quip, “Too much of a good thing is wonderful,” choreographer and ABT Artist in Residence, Alexei Ratmansky, whose interpretation of the iconic fairy tale landed in Orange County stuffed with ballet stars, sequins and sky-high wigs, this over-the-top world premiere is somewhat of a snooze. Blame, too, must be placed on Richard Hudson’s elaborate sets and costumes, which, although inspired by Léon Bakst’s 1921 Ballets Russes production,“The Sleeping Princess,” might be better suited to Las Vegas or Macao, where spectacle is the norm but taste is generally tossed aside.

Continue Reading
Martha Graham Dance Company
REVIEWS | By Madison Mainwaring

Comic Relief

Martha Graham’s legacy remains something of a problem for the company she founded in 1926, which continues performing her work today. Review after review will tell you that her seminal works feel outdated, even kitsch. Isamu Noguchi’s sets, with their mobiles and stylized sculptures, look like relics of an old avant garde. The women interpreting roles Graham originally created for herself end up looking a lot like Graham, with heavy makeup and strange, angular buns. The audience laughs at moments which are supposed to be serious, as when the “Creature of Fear” (aka the Minotaur) menaces the female version of...

Continue Reading
Sara Mearns
REVIEWS | By Oksana Khadarina

Mercurial Manoeuvres

“New Combinations” was an apt way to describe the outstanding triple bill that featured “Pictures at an Exhibition” by Alexei Ratmansky, “‘Rōdē,ō: Four Dance Episodes” by Justin Peck, and “Mercurial Manoeuvres” by Christopher Wheeldon. All works were specifically created for NYCB in the 21st century; all three choreographers have close artistic and collaborative ties (past and present) with the company.

Continue Reading
Harlequinade
REVIEWS | By Oksana Khadarina

Harlequinade

It’s been a decade since New York City Ballet staged George Balanchine’s vibrant ballet-comedy “Harlequinade,” and the current revival of this sparkling gem comes just in time to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the original production.

Continue Reading
Justin Peck Rodeo
REVIEWS | By Madison Mainwaring

The Frontier Revisited

The American sensibility has a lot to do with a sense of the space. This might be why theaters in the US started making their stages wider and more expansive than their European counterparts, as if trying to match the topography outside. In 1942, when Agnes de Mille choreographed “Rodeo” (pronounced “ro-day-o”) to a commissioned score by Aaron Copland, she worked with this idea of the expanse, its limitlessness, the way in which it can intoxicate its inhabitants with aspirations and anxieties.

Continue Reading
Crystal Pite
REVIEWS | By Sara Veale

Modern Landscapes

Sadler's Wells first started appointing associate artists a decade ago, and the prestigious title has evolved into a distinct badge of influence: Sadler's associates don't simply add to the landscape of contemporary dance; they decide where its borders will extend to next. This bill features new commissions from Kate Prince, Crystal Pite and Hofesh Shechter—three current associates whose bodies of work vary wildly in tone but each place a premium on wit and seeking out the humanity in the subjects they cover. The showcase is an illuminating snapshot of the mutable nature of contemporary dance and the diverse territories the...

Continue Reading
Good Subscription Agency